New Books By Alumni Authors

Special Advertising Section

 

Hon. Charles B. Schudson ’72
Independence Corrupted
The verdict is in…“courageous…timely, troubling…surpassingly well written…riveting…a true masterpiece.” Nominee, National Book Award. No. 1 on Amazon’s “Justice System” best-seller list…and the 2022 Kindle edition just came out! Amazon.com/$9.99. 

 

 

 

 

Norman Fiering ’56 
Understanding Rosenstock-Huessy: A Haphazard Collection of Ventures

Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, a Dartmouth professor from 1935 to 1957, was one of the most profound and original thinkers of the twentieth century. His voice was prophetic and remains relevant. The author was a student of Rosenstock-Huessy’s in the 1950s.

 

 

 

 

John S. Loconte ’84
Zack Naturally: A Child’s Zen Companion
Zack is having the worst of days at his new school, and his negative thoughts begin to dwarf him. This Zen primer introduces children to mindfulness principles.  Written originally for the author’s late daughter Ali, proceeds of this book fund high school performing artists.

 

 

 

 

 

Howard Reiss ’73
Starlight Shines Far
During rehab Alex meets Alula who claims to be from another star system. She enlists his help to save our broken planet sure the Earth’s leaders will act once they learn we are not alone. While they are not welcomed as she had hoped, it remains a story about healing a broken heart.

 

 

 

 

John Reed ’75, Tu'79
Pinpointing Excellence
A buyer’s guide to help clients use only excellent executive coaches and avoid others in a disorganized, unregulated, $20B sector – from the leading proponent for higher quality and ROI to professionalize the field - a Tuck-trained business psychologist and master coach.

 

 

 

 

Richard Messina PHD '74, Tu '76
Redesigning The University

Higher education is at an inflection point. This book describes experience-based ideas, strategic options, and practical approaches to help university leaders navigate their institution’s path to long-term success during this transformative time.

 

 

 

 

Tony Choueke ’68
The Little Jessica
This is a story about a girl with dreams and ambitions.  She takes risks and faces obstacles. She learns to plan, and to commit herself to her goals. Digital version: https://www.flipsnack.com/A6FDED77C6F/the-little-jessica/full-view.html. Hard copy: tchoueke@aol.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tony Choueke ’68
Happiness Empanadas
This is a business book for girls.  Identify your passions, start your own business and  create your own unique and individual pathway to success. You can do it! https://www.flipsnack.com/A6FDED77C6F/happiness-empanadas_flipbook-2/ful.... Hard Copy:  tchoueke@aol.com.

 

 

 


Stephen Pearsall ’53
Ithaca The Long Road Home
Ithaca portrays Kyle’s journey from childhood in Wisconsin, to Stanford, to Vietnam, and to his election as a US Senator and his focus on gun proliferation. It is a story of war and adventure, intense relationships, love, greed, malice, and murder.           

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judith A. Byfield ’80
The Great Upheaval: Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria
This social and intellectual history of women’s political activism in postwar Nigeria reveals the importance of gender to the study of nationalism and poses new questions about Nigeria’s colonial past and independent future.

 

 

 

 


Henry L. Clarke ’62
A New Embassy along an Ancient Route in Uzbekistan
Uzbeks welcomed independence for the third largest population, after Russia and Ukraine, in the USSR. But can independence endure?  The first U.S. Ambassador to Uzbekistan describes what it took to create a new relationship and a new embassy in Tashkent. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas A. Barnico ’77
War College
Jack Dunne lives two lives:  one in Vietnam in Army intelligence and the other as a student on an elite American campus.  Bridging these worlds challenges Jack as much as the war itself, as his service sparks personal conflicts on his ivy-draped campus and beyond.

 

 

 

Tom Hall ’54
Time to Come Clean: Rescuing Jesus from Christianity
Conflating Jesus and Christ has resulted in an increasingly irrelevant salvation faith based on an outdated belief system. Both pew and pulpit must bring the Master’s timeless ethical message back to Earth and make it meaningful in the daily lives of 21st century people.

 

 

 

 

 

Robert L. Wallace  Tu’84
Let God be God: Using God’s Disruptive Power to Change Your Life and the World
Robert L. Wallace, a successful author, entrepreneur, business consultant, and ordained Church Elder, shares the tenets and provides a step-by-step, Bible-based approach on how to leverage God’s power to change individual lives and the world.

 

 

 

Matt Richardson ’91
Black Canvas: A Campus Haunting
Black Canvas is gothic horror set at Dartmouth in the 1980s. A young, nonbinary Black college student finds that their dream of the Ivy League is a living nightmare. Each day they uncover new details in the campus’ hidden history, sending them spiraling toward an irrevocable crisis.

 

 

 

 


Jack Anderson ’72
Havilah Daze
A quiet town hides its tawdry affairs and endemic gossip. But then a progressive urbanite gets stranded among its wild but lovable cast of characters. Irresistible forces meet immoveable objects.  But BEWARE: This novel is guaranteed to offend almost everybody! In Paperback and Kindle on Amazon.

 

 

 

 

Charles A. (Chuck) Hobbie ’67
Days of  Splendor, Hours like Dreams: Four Years at a Small College in the Still North
A detailed and frank memoir of college life in the last decade of Dartmouth’s all-male culture recounts the minutiae of courses; friendships with classmates, dates, and faculty; academic, social, musical, and sporting events; and Chuck’s evolving affection for Dartmouth.

 

 

 

 

Charles A. (Chuck) Hobbie ’67
Through Grateful Eyes: The Peace Corps Experiences of Dartmouth’s Class of 1967
Many of Dartmouth’s class of 1967 served in the Peace Corps, living and working amid unimaginable disease, extreme poverty, and other hardships while promoting world peace and friendship in 24 different countries. This book features their incredible stories.

 

 

Warren Valdmanis ’95
Accountable: The Rise of Citizen Capitalism
This provocative book takes us inside the fight to save capitalism from itself. Corporations are broken. But the tools we are relying on to fix them—corporate social responsibility, divestment, impact investing, and government control—risk making our problems worse.

 

 

 

 

Charles “Kip” Ault ’72
Beyond Science Standards: Play, Art, Coherence, Community  

A vision of science education offering inspiring stories of science teaching, varying from place to place, discipline to discipline, purpose to purpose, that argues for prioritizing the social value of particular knowledge, not general scientific processes, in choosing what to teach.

 

 

 

 

 

Gard Hartmann ’65
Storyboarding Noir: Image, Memory, and Personal Style: Ran Blake on Film
Storyboarding Noir offers a new perspective on the rich and varied history of film noir—demonstrating how a film-making technique can be adapted to composition and performance of music. Classic films include The Pawnbroker, Taxi Driver, Hitchcock and French New Wave

 

 

 

 

Tony Ferrari ’18
The Power of Hope: How to Overcome Adversity and Rise to Your Highest Self

The Power of Hope is a collection of uplifting stories about overcoming adversity, turning pain into power, and choosing hope over fear. By weaving the stories of successful leaders and lessons in his own life, Tony teaches us how adversity can be the key to unleashing the greatness within us.

 

 

 

 


Mary Hart ’82
Cast
Drawings by Mary Hart and poems by Flynn O’Brien explore the constancy of change and the unsettling nature of loss. A Boston Globe review describes the book as “Verses of mortality and wonder” that suggest “… the impermanence of all our worldly detritus, and the permanence of the ineffable….”

 

 

 

 

Adam Barsky ’05
Max Sharp and the Belarusian Butcher
Max pursues his father’s killer after learning, sixteen years later, that his death was not a suicide. Straight-laced Yale-grad Max recruits his ex-girlfriend’s family of criminals to find his father’s stolen diamonds and pushes his limits to uncover the mystery of his father’s death.

 

 

 

 

Daisy Alpert Florin ’95
My Last Innocent Year: A Novel
“Remarkable, unputdownable, brilliant.”—Joanna Rakoff, author of My Salinger Year. An incisive, deeply resonant debut novel about a nonconsensual sexual encounter that propels one woman’s final semester at an elite New England college into controversy and chaos—and into an ill-advised affair with a married professor. Publishing Feb. 2023.

 

 

 

 

Francis Y. Barel Tu’05
A Thousand Doors: A Thriller

In the near future, teleportation is ubiquitous. Dr. Henry Becker is the world’s leading oncologist, teleporting tumors out of his patients. But when the police find a body, killed by weaponized teleportation, they call Henry. He will have to solve this, before his daughter teleports to the moon.

 

 

 

 


Rick Gerardi ’74
If Not Us...
Night terrors have seized Eric Russo’s sleep and are disrupting his life.  Hypnosis is the path to uncover the underlying trauma of his nocturnal episodes.  The sessions open a portal to a past-life narrative of a Colonial militiaman which may explain his torment and ultimately, a more engaged life.

 

 

 

 

 

George Ledec ’80
Greening the Wind: Environmental and Social Considerations for Wind Power Development
Despite its lack of greenhouse gas emissions, wind power kills birds and bats while significantly altering natural and rural landscapes. This authoritative guidebook explains how best to mitigate these adverse environmental and social impacts.

 

 

 

 

Samuel C. Florman ’46, Tu’73
The Civilized Engineer
Samuel C. Florman draws on more than 50 years of civil engineering and professional writing to bring what The New York Times Book Review calls “beautiful clarity” to guide readers on an exploration of engineering ethics and how time transformed them.

 

 

 

 

Martin Lion Aronson ’55
Full Courtroom Press

This Boston-based courtroom drama focuses on a love affair between priest and nun that erodes into near suicide. The book’s hero also juggles a custody battle with head-spinning twists and turns. Learn how a lawyer strategizes for trial.  A page-turner!

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are a Dartmouth alum, faculty or staff author, we welcome you to promote your book in Dartmouth Alumni Magazine’s special advertising section, the Dartmouth Alumni Bookshelf. Highlight your book to 59,000 avid DAM readers in an upcoming issue.

Promotion Package Includes:
• A full color photo of your book jacket
• Your name and class year/Dartmouth affiliation
• The title of your book
• 250 characters of text to describe your book
• Marketing in both print and online versions of DAM

For more information, please contact :
Chris Flaherty
advertising@dartmouth.edu
(603) 646-1208

Portfolio

Alumni Books
New titles from Dartmouth writers (January/February 2023)
Building Bridges
Architect Parke MacDowell ’07 takes a hands-on approach.
The Gatekeepers

Admit? Wait list? Deny? A behind-the-scenes look at how admissions officers make their decisions

Nathaniel Fick ’99
A new ambassador on cyber threats

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