Alumni Books

New titles from Dartmouth writers (January/February 2019)

Bruce Sherman ’53 offers advice and reflections on the role of grandparents in raising children with How Grandparents Can Handle Grandkids’ Issues…from Cults to Visitation (Outskirts Press).

Litigator Wayne Beyer ’67 provides a guide on the law of police liability under the civil rights statute for lawyers who sue or defend cases against police and sheriff departments and judges in Police Misconduct: A Practitioner’s Guide to Section 1983 (Juris Publishing).

Colgate University music professor Joseph Swain ’77 considers why two German composers—born less than one month and 100 miles apart—could each achieve universal acclaim despite their differences in Listening to Bach and Handel: A Comparative Critique (Pendragon Press).

Mark Graber ’78, a professor at the University of Maryland law school, examines whether recent global events portend a move away from international constitutional democracies as coauthor of Constitutional Democracy in Crisis? (Oxford University Press). In a second book by the same publisher, The Complete American Constitutionalism: The Constitution of the Confederate States, Graber offers a comprehensive analysis of the Confederate constitution during the American Civil War.

In her first children’s book, longtime outdoor writer Lisa Densmore Ballard ’83 tells the story of a legendary pirate who terrorized the west coast of Florida during the 1800s in Gasparilla: A Pirate’s Tale (Richter Publishing).

Matthew Bagger ’86, Adv’90, who teaches religious studies at the University of Alabama, offers a collection of scholars’ essays that consider pragmatism’s merits for the study of religion and democratic theory and as a general philosophical orientation as editor of Pragmatism and Naturalism: Scientific and Social Inquiry After Representationalism (Columbia University Press).

Buyouts Insider executive editor and cartoonist David Toll ’87 combines his experience with the private equity industry and his talent for drawing in his first book, A Cartoon Lover’s Guide to Private Equity (self-published).

Eastern Illinois University English professor Marjorie Worthington ’90 charts the development and implications of a genre in which an author appears as a fictionalized character in The Story of “Me”: Contemporary American Autofiction (University of Nebraska Press).

Jeff Strabone ’92, an English professor at Connecticut College, explores how poets and antiquarian editors repurposed archaic poetic texts as the foundation of a new concept of nation in Poetry and British Nationalisms in the Bardic Eighteenth Century: Imagined Antiquities (Palgrave Macmillan).

Jonathan Eburne ’93, a comparative literature professor at Pennsylvania State University, considers the role of outlandish ideas in contemporary intellectual history and argues for taking seriously ideas that might otherwise be regarded as errant or unreasonable in Outsider Theory: Intellectual Histories of Unorthodox Ideas (University of Minnesota Press).

Elementary school teacher and librarian Sara Leach ’93 offers a second book on second-grader Lauren, who has autism, this time as she takes on the challenges of extended family and the role of flower girl, in Penguin Days (Pajama Press).

Former criminal investigator Seth Abramson ’98 pulls together the threads of the complicated Trump-Russia story to make the case for a quid pro quo between President Trump and the Kremlin in Proof of Collusion: How Trump Betrayed America (Simon & Schuster).

Dartmouth photographer and avid hiker Eli Burakian ’00 informs adventurers—from the freshly booted novice to the grizzled mountaineer—about 48 iconic mountains in his latest outdoor guide, Climbing New Hampshire’s 48 4,000 Footers (Falcon Guides).

Anne Merritt ’05, M.D., an emergency medicine professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine, shares a close-up view of life, illness, and death in her first book of poetry, Light Through Marble Veins (Kelsay Books).

Queens College media studies professor Noah Tsika ’05 traces the development of psychiatric and psychotherapeutic approaches to wartime trauma by the U.S. military in Traumatic Imprints: Cinema, Military Psychiatry, and the Aftermath of War (University of California Press).

Portfolio

Alumni Books
New titles from Dartmouth writers (September/October 2019)
Command Performance
Composer Oliver Caplan ’04 celebrates sestercentennial.
Living Well for Culture

Journalist Chelsey Luger ’10 is on a mission to promote health and fitness among Native American communities.

Ann McLane Kuster ’78
A fourth-term congresswoman on working for the people

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