• Alums Sylvanus Thayer and Alden Partridge are remembered as the “Father of West Point” and the “Father of the ROTC,” respectively. They also hated each other.
  • A collection of recent works by 10 alumni poets
  • Excerpts from a new activity book for professors (edited by Christie Henry ’91) capture the bizarre highs and arcane lows of academic life.
  • Harvard prof and author Leah Wright Rigueur ’03 discusses the history and future of blacks and the GOP.
Fighters to the End
Alums Sylvanus Thayer and Alden Partridge are remembered as the “Father of West Point” and the “Father of the ROTC,” respectively. They also hated each other.
Features

Wayward

A few tidbits about journalist, Francophile and eater A.J. Liebling ’24, one of those famous alums who never graduated.
Features

American Dreamer

An undocumented undergrad from Mexico shares his story—and his fears.
Web Extra
Web Extras

Fake News!

Onion staffer Mike Gillis ’12 on writing for “America’s Finest News Source” and the role of satire in a post-truth world
Features

Meryl, Overrated?

Not even close, as the screenwriter of The River Wild recalls.
Web Extra
Web Extras

Subway Encounter

EXCERPT: Late night, New York City. Street thugs confront a young Brandon del Pozo. What happened next changes his life.
Features

Dana (Thomas) Bevan ’69

A transgender bio-psychologist on embracing her true self
Features

Art Imitates Life

Jean Hanff Korelitz ’83 discusses her latest novel, The Devil and Webster, and how Dartmouth influenced her story.

Photo Gallery

View All Galleries
  • Although no images of Augustus Washington are known to exist, this circa 1847 portrait of abolitionist John Brown is the best-known example of his work.
    1/7
  • Lydia Sigourney
    2/7
  • Rev. Philip Coker
    3/7
  • Unknown
    4/7
  • Unknown
    5/7
  • Unknown
    6/7
  • Chancy Brown
    7/7

Augustus Washington, the son of a South Asian immigrant and a former Virginia slave, matriculated at Dartmouth in 1843 as its only black student. He quickly found himself burdened with accumulating debt and turned to photography to help pay his tuition bills. Perhaps weary from dealing with the pro-slavery attitude of College President Nathan Lord, Washington left Dartmouth at the end of his freshmen year.

Within three years of declaring in an 1851 op-ed in The New York Daily Tribune that Liberia was the last hope for black Americans in search of freedom, Washington had raised enough funds—by aggressively soliciting new clients to sit for portraits—to move with his wife and their two small children across the Atlantic. They were settled in Monrovia by December of 1853, and Washington wasted no time establishing himself as Liberia’s foremost photographer.

His clients ranged from public figures such as abolitionist John Brown and poet Lydia Sigourney to citizens of modest means. Liberian subjects included the country’s senate chaplain, Rev. Philip Coker and the senate sergeant at arms, Chancy Brown.

Read more about Washington in the May/June 2017 issue of DAM.

Although no images of Augustus Washington are known to exist, this circa 1847 portrait of abolitionist John Brown is the best-known example of his work.
1/7
Dartmouth Alumni Magazines Fanned Out

Register

Maximize the benefits of your alumni magazine website simply by entering a username, password and your class year. We’ll have you squared away in no time.

Register Now