Shelf Life

New books by Dartmouth alumni

Paul Griffin ’88, who has been working with at-risk teens since 1989, follows his novel The Orange Houses, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults Top Ten, with Stay With Me, a heartbreaking and uplifting story of first love.

Mel Small ’60, a professor of history, emeritus, at Wayne State University, edits an overview of Richard M. Nixon’s life, presidency and legacy, as well as a detailed look at the state of Nixon scholarship, in A Companion to Richard M. Nixon (Wiley-Blackwell).

Kristin Roth-Ey ’89, a lecturer in modern Russian history at the University College London School of Slavonic and East European Studies, offers a portrait of the Soviet broadcasting and film industries and everyday consumers from the end of WW II through the 1970s in Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire That Lost the Cultural Cold War (Cornell University Press).

Humorist and poet Glenn Currie ’65 shares his mostly humorous, sometimes introspective thoughts about life in New Hampshire in his fifth book, Granite Grumblings (Snap Screen Press).

Kirk Read ’81, a professor of French at Bates College, brings together literary and medical texts that explore the popular 16th- and early 17th-century narratives of birth in Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France: Stories of Gender and Reproduction (Ashgate).

Alexandra Zissu ’96, who writes about green living, food and parenthood (her “Ask an Organic Mom” column is featured on TheDailyGreen.com), gathers a compendium of the firsthand knowledge of New York butchers (and coauthors) Joshua and Jessica Applestone in The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat: How to Buy, Cut, and Cook Great Beef, Lamb, Pork, Poultry, and More (Clarkson Potter).

Roy Rowan ’41, Tu’42, a former correspondent for Time, Life and Fortune magazines, explores the pleasures of old age based on a long life crammed with adventures in Never Too Late: A 90-year-old’s Pursuit of a Whirlwind Life (Lyons Press).

Douglas Skopp ’62, an historian and former history professor at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh, mines his archival research on medical ethics in Germany as he follows a pair of physicians through the two world wars in his historical novel, Shadows Walking (CreateSpace).

Lance Dodes ’66, DMS’68, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School and a training and supervising analyst at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, shares a new theory about the nature and treatment of addiction in Breaking Addiction: A 7-Step Handbook for Ending Any Addiction (HarperCollins).

Poet and arts writer Carl Little ’76 examines the crucial role New England played in the development of one of America’s most recognized painters in Edward Hopper’s New England (Pomegranate).

Jacqueline Francis ’85, a senior lecturer at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, is co-editor of Romare Bearden, American Modernist (National Gallery of Art), a collection of writings about the painter and mixed media artist.

Christopher Hamner ’95, an assistant professor of history at George Mason University, examines why soldiers fight in the face of terrifying lethal threats and how they marshal the will to kill other humans in Enduring Battle: American Soldiers in Three Wars, 1776-1945 (University Press of Kansas).

Historian Dave Norman, Adv’07, explores the history of White River Junction, Vermont, in White River Junctions (f/64 Publishing).

Portfolio

Alumni Books
New titles from Dartmouth writers (May/June 2022)
Inspiration Unearthed
Artist Karyn Olivier ’89 digs into history.
Vox Clamantis in Deserto

A special issue in celebration of Dartmouth’s 250th anniversary

“Sandy” Alderson ’69
The New York Mets president on America’s game

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